Astronaut and Marine Colonel Nicole Onapo-Mann becomes the first Native American woman in space

Astronaut and Marine Colonel Nicole Onapo-Mann becomes the first Native American woman in space when NASA launches her crew to the International Space Station in October

  • Astronaut Nicole Onapo-Man will become the first Native American woman to reach space in October
  • “I feel very proud,” Mann said. “It’s important that we celebrate our diversity and really pass that on to the younger generation specifically.”
  • Mann, Wailacki of the Round Valley Indian Tribes in Northern California, will join the International Space Station’s next crew course
  • She did combat missions before being recruited by NASA in 2013 and undergoing extensive training for her space mission.

Astronaut and Marine Colonel Nicole Onapo-Mann will become the first Native American woman in space when the next NASA crew arrives at the International Space Station in October.

Mann flew on US combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan before being recruited by NASA in 2013 and completing her candidate training two years later.

“It was a long journey, but it was well worth it,” Mann, a member of the Wailaki of the Round Valley Indian tribes in northern California, told Reuters.

Astronaut and Marine Colonel Nicole Onobo-Mann will become the first Native American woman in space when the next NASA crew arrives at the International Space Station in October.

Mann flew on US combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan before being recruited by NASA in 2013 and completing her candidate training two years later.

Mann flew on US combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan before being recruited by NASA in 2013 and completing her candidate training two years later.

MAN’s training provided by NASA included extensive instruction in International Space Station systems, spacewalks, Russian language training, robotics, and physiological training.

“I feel very proud,” Mann said. “It’s important that we celebrate our diversity and really pass that on to the younger generation specifically.”

Mann will be the first Native American woman in space. John Herrington was the first Native American man in space in 2002.

She holds degrees from the US Naval Academy and Stanford University, and was a test pilot on the F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet during her military career.

Mann, a Wailacki member of the Round Valley Indian tribes in northern California, told Reuters:

“It was a long journey, but it was well worth it,” Mann, a Wailacki member of the Round Valley Indian tribes in northern California, told Reuters.

She'll take some souvenirs with her to orbit to remind her of home, including

She’ll take some mementos with her into orbit to remind her of home, including a “dream hunter,” a traditional Native American protection charm.

She said the discrimination sparked enthusiasm in her community.

“This is really, I think, an audience that we don’t get much access to,” explained Mann, who has two medals from the Marine Corps and the Marine Corps.

MAN is scheduled to blast off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on October 3 aboard SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft and replace his fourth crew from the International Space Station.

MAN is scheduled to blast off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on October 3 aboard SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft and replace his fourth crew from the International Space Station.

She’ll take some mementos with her into orbit to remind her of home, including the “dream hunter,” the traditional Native American protective charm.

MAN, along with NASA astronaut Josh Kasada, Japanese Koichi Wakata, and Russian cosmonaut Anna Kikina, are scheduled to blast off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida October 3 aboard SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft, exchanging Crew-4 from the space station. International.

This mission will follow the launch of NASA’s Artemis 1, which the space agency recently moved to Saturday afternoon after engine problems occurred on Monday.

NASA’s Space Launch System and Orion Crew Capsule are part of America’s long-term goal of getting boots on the moon in the next two years.

“What we do in LEO is not only training astronauts, but also providing technical development and operational concepts that we will need to live (with) a sustainable human presence on the Moon and eventually take us to Mars,” she said.

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